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Jamaican words and phrases - Negril Forum

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Patois and Slang Dictionary
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You are also invited to join his exclusive patron community. Click Here And See. Here are the top 20 Jamaican radio stations, at least in my opinion - with a little background too!

And not only is reggae music the heartbeat of Jamaica, Reggae. Here is a little background into our Jamaica coat of arms - another of our precious national symbols. A brief background into the Jamaican military system plus the current application form. I've created a Welcome Audio. Just click the Play button below to listen. Click Here and join in the fun! You'll instantly receive a free copy of my popular ebook - Intriguing Facts About Jamaica.

Looking to see you on the inside! Do like I did! Share your passion about your city, hobby or experience and make a living from it. Click Here to see how. Comments Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below. And, Before You Go! Didn't find exactly what you were looking for? Are there any Jamaican words, phrases or greetings we should know before we go?

The only one I know is Irie. Something I was taught by my favorite bartender was: Ask for a beer. The bartender will know that when you say beer it means Red Stripe. If you want a Guiness or a Heineken ask for them by name but Red Stripe is always just a beer. And when you ask for your beer, specify hot or cold.

Many people like their beer Red Stripe hot or at room tempature. If you don't want your beer warm, ask for a cool beer and you will get a cold Red Stripe. Has anyone else been told this? It's always worked for us. When we were in Montego Bay last year the bartender kept yelling "jukie jam" at us! I have no idea if it was a drink he made us or if he was calling us crazy. Never the less, I would always yell it back. Any ideas on what "jukie jam" might mean? This also taught me that GOOD warm beer can actually taste good It's costing me a fortune sending Clarkes from England to all my Rood Bwouy friends out there I think they've all nearly got the original UK and best now They all class me as white Jamaican out there Ziggy Marleys' half brother!!!

How we do laugh when sippin beers at the Office!!!! Correct asking for a beer will get you a red stripe, sometimes handed over hot and sometimes cold, so request which one you want before they "pull it" remove the cap. When you ask for something and they say "finish" - that means they do not have anymore.

In retail, it means they do not have anymore and will not have anymore in the foreseeable future. Never heard that about beer vs. Red Stripe - I've always asked for cold Red Stripe learned the hard way if you didn't distinguish, lol.

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Browse Jamaican Expressions Patois words and view their definitions, pronunciations, and alternative spellings on harleos.cf

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Those words that look like they'll be lasting, I'll shift to my page on established Jamaican phrases and words. An interesting thing I've noticed is that some Jamaican slang words take hold of the whole country, all at once, especially if they are used in songs.

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Do you have a Jamaican friend you want to communicate with or are you traveling to Jamaica? Jamaican patois (patwah) is another language. Below is a list of 18 Jamaican Patois phrases translated to English. In an earlier post last year, I discussed 14 English Words & Phrases that Mean Something Totally Different in Jamaican Patois. This time, the patois lessons are about to get harder, as I share 50 words and phrases that — to the best of my knowledge — originated in Jamaica.

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Jamaican Sentences Broken Down into their Individual Words, and Phrases. Learn Patois jargon: Frah wha – from what pawt – part yuh deh – you from. Jamaican Patois, is expressive, colourful and, to a non-Jamaican, often confusing. The Jamaican language is largely a derivative of Spanish, English and African influences on the country through its .